Ocean Sailing Academy | Aurora Sailing Adventure – Second Leg Report
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Aurora Sailing Adventure – Second Leg Report

Aurora Sailing Adventure

Aurora Sailing Adventure – Second Leg Report

Position,
31/5:
33˚ 49’S
029˚ 09’E
Distance to Mauritius, 1711NM
Wind,  F3 SE

Hi All,

Well, it has been an interesting 36 hours for the start of our second leg of the trip up to Mauritius. Leaving PE, we had a westerly wind behind us and had a short trip around Algoa Bay chasing counter current, coming out around Bird Island in a very light westerly. We edged our way along the coast a little while the wind dropped some more and then took our gap to motor across the Agulhas Current.

That was very slow going as the current was pushing nice and strongly after the previous NE winds. More like sailing across a very large fast flowing river. Point the boat upstream and crab your way across. Which is exactly what we did. There was some remaining wind against current swells, but nothing major as the wind had already turned to the North East.

Once across the the worst of it we could beat our way off the coast. As predicted the wind backed around and we could then head in NE direction. Following a really nice beat into a Force 5 (Beaufort Force weather for those who want to look it up) during the night, the wind veered and now we are sitting in a nice gentle F3 SE.

Plenty of sail changes and adjustments to keep the guys busy and out of bed… Therefore I am currently writing to you from a very quiet boat, except for the snoring… Zee and Heinz in a cabin chorus.

However, it has been the most beautiful full moon both nights and glorious clear warm weather during the day. Our first night with the wind from the west was cold, bitterly cold Antarctic air, chilling to the bone. However last nights north was lovely and warm. Easy to sit up on deck and enjoy the magnificent views created by the sea swells reflecting in the huge glowing moon because for some reason the moon always looks closer from sea.

The crews spirits have been high and the laughing hearty and loud, which is a very promising sign at this early stage.

So, with the current crossing behind us our next goal is to avoid the “coming storm”. We just need to get another 120 odd miles north and we can catch the tip of it tomorrow evening and like a surfer on a big wave, ride it as long as we can, before it peters out or rolls on past us.

With that I will write soon, and those in Cape Town, enjoy the rain.

Cheers

Wavy